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Haiti Economic Hope?

Web Series

Haiti Economic Hope?

Even for the long troubled history of Haiti, this has been an especially bad year (2010). After the more usual calamities of earthquakes, storms, disease and most recently failed democratic elections, the primary hope has to rest on the economic revival of Haiti spurred by the industrious and ever resilient people. What are the economic prospects for the Haitian people and desperately needed investors.


Transcripts / Production notes / Scripts

Small business, a major economic sector in Haiti was counting on Christmas related activities to help compensate a business year. But post - electoral riots may have quashed that chance when shops were looted and at least four people died. UN economists say growth which was estimated to be down 7 percent before last week's events could be revised to 10 percent for the fiscal year 2010.

Claude Beauboeuf, Economist, United Nations Development Program in Haiti:
“Haitian economics is over stretched, it cannot afford to integrate these kind of problems.”

Dorval, stallholder:
“I would often go twice to town to buy supplies, but since this morning I didn’t sell a single pair of shoes. But the leaders, they have their pockets their fridge full.”

Recita, stallholder:
“This year, there is no feast. Those who burnt tyres on the street, they are not helping us. And what we are asking for, nobody is giving us.”

Claude Beauboeuf, Economist, United Nations Development Program in Haiti:
“This has a consequence on growth rate. ECALC (Economic Community of Latin American Countries) yesterday estimated the growth for Haiti down by 7 percent, but after these events, I am sure that we will reach -8 to -10 percent.”

Ralph Pereira, CEO, CompHaiti computer shop:
“Regarding business we can decide to either raise the margin and just satisfy the operational needs or rather take an aggressive stance and try to convince people to come and buy.”

Demonstrations in Haiti may have crushed any hope for local shopkeepers to bring in extra sales before years end.

Claude Beauboeuf, Economist for United Nations Development Program in Haiti:
“Haitian economics is overstretched; it cannot afford to integrate these kind of problems.”

Small business is a major economic sector in the country. In Petionville market, stallholders were getting ready for Christmas shoppers.

At this time of the year, Dorval, who is sells shoes would have gone twice a day downtown to renew his supplies. But since the post - electoral riots a few days ago, he is blaming leaders for fueling demonstrations.

Dorval, stallholder:
“I would often go twice to town to buy supplies, but since this morning I didn’t sell a single pair of shoes. But the leaders, they have their pockets - their fridge full.”

Another seller, Recita, criticizes demonstrators who ruined her business.
“This year, there is no feast. Those who burnt tyres on the street, they are not helping us. And what we are asking for, nobody is giving us.”

UN economists say Haiti’s growth was expected to fall by 7 percent this year. But after the post election events, it could even drop as low as 10 percent.

For Ralph Pereira, CEO at a main computer shop which was looted during the riots, there is no possible long term strategy for business in Haiti.

Ralph Pereira, CEO CompHaiti computer shop:
“Regarding business we can decide to either raise the margin and just satisfy the operational needs or rather take an aggressive stance and try to convince people to come and buy.”

A week-long violent demonstration where at least four people died followed the primary results of the first round of elections last Tuesday when the opposition accused the ruling president to have forced the way for his sponsored candidate Jude Celestin.


Details

Language: French

Year of Production: 2010

Length: 2:30

Country: Haiti

License

Creative Commons License

Haiti Economic Hope? by DiplomaticallyIncorrect.org is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 License.


Directors:

  • Mo Sacirbey UNTV

Producers:

  • Susan Sacirbey