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Haiti Year Later/More to Do

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Haiti Year Later/More to Do

One year later Haiti is still struggling in the aftermath of a devastating earthquake. The distaster has had a tragic impact especially on children. 380,000 children remain in overcrowded camps that are home to millions.
UNICEF has worked to provide safe water and child-friendly spaces in the camps, vaccinations and other health services, and in addition has rushed to rebuild some 57 schools.
Combined with hurricane flooding and a political crisis, cholera in particular has presented a massive challenge. UNICEF played a key role in the rapid response to the outbreak by mobilizing staff, resources and life-saving supplies and has since helped set up 72 cholera treatment centres but these successive crises have slowed the progress of recovery.


Transcripts / Production notes / Scripts

One year on, Haiti is still struggling with the aftermath of the devastating 12 January 2010 earthquake, a disaster that had a profound impact on children.

SOUNDBITE (English) Francoise Gruloos Ackermans, UNICEF Haiti Representative:
”More than 200,000 people died, perished, in the earthquake. Half of them were probably children. Many, many people were displaced, internally displaced, half of them were children again, probably a million of children. Many of these children, if not all, they suffered, they were injured, they were traumatized. Many of these children in fact lost the life that they had before.”

Today, more than a million people remain in overcrowded camps, including an estimated 380,000 children. Children like six-year-old Judeline Brasiers lost her father when the family’s home collapsed.

SOUNDBITE (Creole) Phara Brasiers, Mother:
”Things have been really hard since the earthquake. We’ve been left with nothing.”

SOUNDBITE (English) Francoise Gruloos Ackermans, UNICEF Haiti Representative:
”Of course we will also always say that we can be frustrated, we will also say that we haven’t done enough but we are coming from far, even before the earthquake. So I think we have made many achievements.”

None more important perhaps, than getting children back to school. UNICEF has rebuilt 57 destroyed schools for children like Judeline with many more under way, schools which besides providing education play a crucial supportive role.

SOUNDBITE (Creole) Henriette Moisset, Headmistress, Ecole Celie Lilavois:
“They are really traumatized, but in school we try to give them hope, to talk to them and to put them in an environment that helps them cope with that burden.”

UNICEF has ensured that children living in the camps are provided with safe water and child-friendly spaces, making sure they have access to vaccinations and health services, preventing them from becoming malnourished and protecting them from harm, but the earthquake was not the only unprecedented emergency Haiti suffered in 2010

SOUNDBITE (English) Francoise Gruloos Ackermans, UNICEF Haiti Representative:
”The cholera outbreak that became an epidemic and that is now endemic in this country was also unprecedented. It blew up – we have more than 100,000 cases and we know we will have more.”

Combined with hurricane flooding and a political crisis, cholera in particular has presented a massive challenge. UNICEF played a key role in the rapid response to the outbreak by mobilizing staff, resources and life-saving supplies and has since helped set up 72 cholera treatment centres but these successive crises have slowed the progress of recovery.

SOUNDBITE (English) Anthony Lake, UNICEF Executive Director:
”In some areas we’re still in what’s called the relief phase, getting rid of the rubble, rebuilding the schools. It’s been very slow but I think we shouldn’t think about it in phases anyway and everything we’re doing now in the relief area ought to be with an eye on where we want to be further down the road.”

The earthquake and cholera epidemic have also highlighted Haiti’s deep and long-standing disparities and reinforced UNICEF’s focus on equity.

SOUNDBITE (English) Francoise Gruloos Ackermans, UNICEF Haiti Representative:
”When you see the situation here and you realize there are so many things to do and sometimes you do not know where to start but when you focus on equity you say ok, my role here is to work with the most vulnerable.”

UNICEF has redoubled its work in the most impoverished neighbourhoods of the capital, Port-au-Prince; working with the government and other partners to ensure water is chlorinated, distributing water purification tablets and providing essential information on cholera prevention, but reaching the most vulnerable in Haiti extends beyond the cities.

Working with its partners, UNICEF has sought to reach remote rural communities, flying-in basic health supplies, setting up semi-permanent schools, giving children opportunities they never had before.

While challenges faced in addressing the country’s successive crisis remain enormous, UNICEF will strive to meet Haiti’s humanitarian needs extending its response in 2011 to those who have not yet been reached, tackling endemic poverty and disparities throughout the country and maintaining its commitment to bring lasting, positive change to the lives of Haiti’s children.

Details

Language: English

Year of Production: 2011

Length: 4:30 Mins

Country: Haiti

License

Creative Commons License

Haiti Year Later/More to Do by DiplomaticallyIncorrect.org is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 License.


Directors:

  • Tom Osborne, UNTV (UNICEF)

Producers:

  • Muhamed sacirbey