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Mali Electricity & Crickets

Technology

Mali Electricity & Crickets

(Yes, that is crickets providing harmony)- Mali recently only had sporadic electricity and for only 1/4 of its population. Much of the huge country and particularly the small towns and villages had no power. Now, with World Bank assistance (and increasingly using renewable energy) power is coming to many more people including businesses allowing for higher productivity and opportunity in this society.

It’s dark out, but Maimouna Sacko is still working.

She owns this small restaurant in the city of Seribala in central Mali. Until recently, she served only breakfast and lunch.

SOUNDBITE (Bambara) Maimouna Sacko, Restaurant Owner:
“It has changed a lot to have electricity. Before, I needed a generator and it was expensive to pay for its fuel. I use the electricity also in the daytime for the fridge.”

Maimouna now gets electricity from a nearby power station as a part of a national energy project, supported by the World Bank.

The project is providing electricity to thousands of households, public institutions and businesses like Maimouna’s.

SOUNDBITE (Bambara) Maimouna Sacko, Restaurant Owner:
“It is not even comparable to before. Now I work at night and also in the daytime I can sell cold drinks so I am selling more now than before.”

Only 24 percent of Mali’s population has access to electricity. That rate is even lower in rural areas like Seribala, where only about 13 percent of people have access.

The energy project is reversing that by paying local private sector companies to operate off-grid power stations, like the one providing energy to Seribala.

SOUNDBITE (French) Kibili Demba, Administrator, Seribala Power Station:
“All development depends on electricity. We can’t progress in obscurity. The people were in obscurity before we came. Now the city is doing well.”

The project funds almost 50 private companies to manage about 80 power stations across the country. The stations provide power to 650,000 people and about 803 public institutions.

The Seribala Power Station provides electricity to shop owner Amadou Drame.

SOUNDBITE (French) Amadou Drame, Store Owner:
“We are happy. Even if the bill is sometimes expensive, I do all I can to pay and if there is a problem, the company comes and fixes it immediately.”

Amadou says since getting electricity he does business until two in the morning, and is able to meet the needs of his two wives and 11 children.


Transcripts / Production notes / Scripts

It’s dark out, but Maimouna Sacko is still working.

She owns this small restaurant in the city of Seribala in central Mali. Until recently, she served only breakfast and lunch.

SOUNDBITE (Bambara) Maimouna Sacko, Restaurant Owner:
“It has changed a lot to have electricity. Before, I needed a generator and it was expensive to pay for its fuel. I use the electricity also in the daytime for the fridge.”

Maimouna now gets electricity from a nearby power station as a part of a national energy project, supported by the World Bank.

The project is providing electricity to thousands of households, public institutions and businesses like Maimouna’s.

SOUNDBITE (Bambara) Maimouna Sacko, Restaurant Owner:
“It is not even comparable to before. Now I work at night and also in the daytime I can sell cold drinks so I am selling more now than before.”

Only 24 percent of Mali’s population has access to electricity. That rate is even lower in rural areas like Seribala, where only about 13 percent of people have access.

The energy project is reversing that by paying local private sector companies to operate off-grid power stations, like the one providing energy to Seribala.

SOUNDBITE (French) Kibili Demba, Administrator, Seribala Power Station:
“All development depends on electricity. We can’t progress in obscurity. The people were in obscurity before we came. Now the city is doing well.”

The project funds almost 50 private companies to manage about 80 power stations across the country. The stations provide power to 650,000 people and about 803 public institutions.

The Seribala Power Station provides electricity to shop owner Amadou Drame.

SOUNDBITE (French) Amadou Drame, Store Owner:
“We are happy. Even if the bill is sometimes expensive, I do all I can to pay and if there is a problem, the company comes and fixes it immediately.”

Amadou says since getting electricity he does business until two in the morning, and is able to meet the needs of his two wives and 11 children.

Details

Language: French

Year of Production: 2011

Length: 2 mins

Country: Mali

License

Creative Commons License

Mali Electricity & Crickets by DiplomaticallyIncorrect.org is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 License.


Directors:

  • Muhamed Sacirbey, UNTV-World Bank

Producers:

  • Susan Sacirbey