Wild Horses at North Carolina Outer Banks (Part 1)

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WILD MUSTANG HORSES

 

(IMAGE SOURCE: google.com)

In this article I will discuss 2 of the 4 breeds of wild horses found on the coastline of North Carolina. These breed of wild horses roam free on 2,500 Acres of North Carolina's Coastal barrier island chain.

(IMAGES SOURCE: google.com)

History:-

Long time ago, all horses were wild animals. They roamed freely in large herds all over the world, and some suggest the early horse known as the Dawn horse originated in North Americas. According to some, these horses were present along with some other heavy creatures such as, Saber Tooth Tiger, American Camel, Wooly Mamoth etc. The America horse is the only animal still alive from that period of time. These wild horses crossed over land bridges to end up in places such as Portugal and Spain. Some 4,000 years ago the domestication of horses took place in the Black Sea region and it changed everything from  transportation to warfare to exploration.

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  • Early Explorers:-  Among the early explorers to the North Carolina Outter banks were Lucas Vasques de Alloyn and his captain Gordilk, who landed with their ship near an area now known as "Cape Fare" in 1521. According to some, Alloyn and his expedition ran by Captain Gordilk had trouble with the Indian. The Spaniards were sending Indian children to the indies as slaves which resulted in the Indian uprising that forced the Spaniards to abandon their belongings and livestock and retreat to their strong hold in Florida.

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  • When the climate of North America changed the "Dawn Horses" migrated to warmer areas of the continent such as the coastlines where the temperature was moderate. The Spanish Conquistador brought strong, sturdy work horses from Spain and Portugal which would carry the early explorers and their belongings through the jungles and deserts of the New World in search of gold.

Types of Wild horses found in North Carolina

 

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Wild Mustangs of Corolla:-

The wild Spanish Mustangs of Corolla can still be seen roaming the coastlines of North Carolina, but due to explosive development in the Corolla village and surrounding areas along with the construction of a highway in the 80s that runs from Duck to Corolla, the Mustang horses do not roam as freely as they one did long ago. Fortunately, through the efforts of the Corolla Wild Horse Fund and other cooperating agencies the Mustangs Corolla wild horses were moved to the north of Corolla to the last remote areas of Currituck Banks.

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People come in droves to admire these beautiful creatures running free in the 11 mile long area bound on one side by the Atlantic Ocean, the Currituck sound on the West and big fences on the north and south that run from Ocean to Sound.

Spotting the Mustangs:- 

(IMAGE SOURCE: google.com)

(IMAGE SOURCE: google.com)

By far, the best method to spot the wild horses is to drive an ATV on the beach from Corolla where Hwy 12 ends on the sound fence. For people who do not have ATVs, they can rent an ATV and search for the wild horses themselves. Also, people can book  a reservation for one of the off road wild horse tours. The tour takes visitors up the beach and through the back roads to see these beautiful wild horses.

 

Wild Horses of Shackleford Banks:-

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These horses area also known as Shackleford Mustangs, are only accessible by boat. DNA results prove these are not ponies but true descendants of Spanish Mustangs brought to the Carolina's in the early 1500s. Either turned loose or left behind when the early explorers had to flee their failed attempts of colonization. The foundation for Shacklefod Horses and National Park's Services Cape Lookout National Seashore Park have provided a 9 mile long barrier island between Beaufort Inlet and Cape Lookout, North Carolina.

(IMAGES SOURCE: google.com)

Spotting Shackleford wild Horses:-

 Visitors ferrying to the lighthouse on Cape Lookout, can spot the Shackleford Wild Horses on the eastern side of the island. Vacationing boats can also land on the island for exploration and see the horses. Another option is to take a ferry from Beaufort to Shackleford and be picked up later in the day by the same ferry. There are also tours and charter services available that can provide both transportation and guide services.

(IMAGES SOURCE: google.com)

More than 100 wild horses call Shackleford their home and occasional adoption is allowed to maintain the herd between 110 and 140 horses.

(IMAGE SOURCE: google.com)

(IMAGE SOURCE: google.com)

Thank you for reading my blog and I hope this was informative and somewhat interesting at the least.

 



About the author

Gama1985

Hey what's up? I'm here in the North Carolina I like basketball, swimming, running, weightlifting, and kicking back watching movies listening to Blues B.B King

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