The Patroline Procedure - Currently Featured :)

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The cold snap seems to be fading in to grey rainy weather in London right now, but there's joy in the fact that The Patroline Procedure is currently being featured :)

Granted, it's a convoluted story, so I'll explain it a little. The content I had and still have planned for the saga is perhaps a bit much to put into five minutes, but seeing as it was the first film at university where I felt I could really get my teeth into experimental lighting, creating soundtracks, working with actors, locations and pursuing a deep narrative, I feel the film is a personal triumph and an experience I took a lot from.

I must also add that I can neither recommend nor condone 'The Glitch Drinking Game'. The rules are simple: whenever you see a glitch, have a drink. I've heard this has being played and they ran out of drink before the film was done. Please watch the film responsibly and with that, heres an explanation for anyone who wants it:


In short, the film's about a team who's duty is to recover people suffering from computer viruses. Household products contain Patroline, which is a substance that effects behaviour which can be controlled by a computer run by the manufacturers. As an example in the film, the point of view character is on an administration work efficiency diet (not by choice, but as suggested by the company he works for). He eats 'Number Crunchers' for breakfast which starts his day immensely prepared for a hard days work. The manufacturers computers fairly suddenly come under fire by hackers and not only does it become riddled with viruses, but the people using the products do so as well, infecting them with a series of surreal side effects.

The first people to arrive at the scene where someone has been suffering from a virus for the best part of four years are Kaile and Yostler. Kaile has the ability to see anyone suffering from the invisibility side effect and Yostler films the area so to advise the other members in the team of the dangerous virus holders where abouts. They check the cupboards to see what patroline products the infected has been using so to get an idea what type of virus they're dealing with.

Next to arrive is Tesla. His responsibility is to disarm as many side effects of the virus as possible, pin point exactly which virus it is (represented by blue, red, green and yellow ribbons across the door) and establish whether the infected person can be recovered or needs to be disposed of. If circumstances are suspicious however (poisoning for example), he can request an archive specialist to investigate.

The archive specialist has software in his brain to trawl through the mind of the infected to collect memories stored as data. If there are memories of people committing foul play upon the infected, a police investigation could take place based on this information. Polcrikot feels he's on borrowed time as his job as an archive specialist is a dangerous one. The process is damaging to the brain and leaves him at risk of contracting terminal viruses from the subject.

The final phase in the worse case scenario (as it is in the film) is the disposals team. En-Norman administers an injection to disable the subject and Galverei steps in to finish him off.
En-Norman, however, had actually been working undercover to make sure everyone infected by the 'Blue Virus' is eliminated of. He was hired by the company of the infected as many were deliberately infected to lay off workers without redundancy.

The purpose of the gas masks is due to a side effect of the virus, hence the virus being known as 'The Masked Informant'.


So there it is. Regardless of the description, I hope you enjoyed it all the same. I've worked a lot on the story since making The Patroline Procedure and a dream of mine is to see it as a four season long TV series one day. Well, one can dream :)


About the author

timorchard

Currently based in West London, I'm a story teller with a curious imagination. I take inspiration from practically everything, I'm cuckoo for atmosphere and I love making films.

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